Book cover of Pter Cratchit's Christmas Carol and a cup of tea

Book Review: Peter Cratchit’s Christmas Carol by Drew Marvin Frayne

Christmas Eve is nearly here making it an ideal time to share my review for Peter Cratchit’s Christmas Carol by Drew Marvin Frayne. I adore A Christmas Carol in both literature and film so was excited to discover what this book had to offer and whether it lived up to the original tale. Scroll down to see if it met my expectations.

Book Review: Peter Cratchit’s Christmas Carol by Drew Marvin Frayne

Book Review: Cratchit’s Christmas Carol by Drew Marvin Frayne

Title: Cratchit’s Christmas Carol

Author: Drew Marvin Frayne

Publisher: NineStar Press, LLC

Genre: festive romance, LGBTQIA

Release date: 18th November 2019

Blurb

Peter Cratchit, a young lad preparing to make his way in the world, is the eldest son of Scrooge’s lowly clerk Bob Cratchit. Peter flourishes under the tutelage of his “Uncle” Scrooge and seeks to make his mark as a man of business, like his uncle before him.

One Christmas Eve, as Scrooge lays dying, Peter embarks on a risky ocean voyage that he believes will secure the future for his family. Onboard, Peter finds love, happiness, and success, only to lose it all by the voyage’s end.

Returning to London, Peter shuns his family and instead finds himself living on the streets, haunted by his failures and his dead lover, selling his body just to survive while he waits for the winter cold to claim him once and for all. But winter snows also mean Christmas is coming, and for the Cratchit family, Christmas is a time of miracles. Can a visit from three familiar spirits change Peter’s life again? Is there one more miracle in store for the lost son of one of Dickens’ most enduring families?

A Note From the Publisher

WARNING: Death of a prominent character, suicidal ideation, suicide

My Thoughts

Peter Cratchit has a lot to live up to; he admires his Uncle Scrooge and what he stood for after the ghosts’ visitation and appreciates the protection and happiness the old man gave. When Scrooge dies, Peter vows to take over the role as protector and make sure the Cratchits are well provided for but nothing is easy. The novel begins with him living on the streets and selling himself in exchange for food in Victorian England. As Christmas approaches, he is ready to give up and die but the ghosts return. Peter’s story of love, lost chances, and determination are revealed in unexpected ways.

Like the original, this book is dark, gritty and highlights poverty and the values of the era when life is cheap but the spirit of Christmas shines through when Peter faces the ghosts Scrooge told him about as a child for himself. Peter and the relationships he has with his family and his partner have depth and the love between them leap from the page. It is an emotional journey but the conclusion left me feeling uplifted, and warm. It will stay with me for a long time.

Elements of this novel are darker and more graphic than the original and it does not hold back in the sex scenes so this is not suitable for children.

Would I recommend?

Yes, if are a lover of A Christmas Carol. Beautifully written, it captures the Dickensian atmosphere and it complements the other Christmas Carol books on my forever shelf well. These include Miss Marley by Vanessa Lafaye, and an illustrated version of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Like them, I will revisit this novel again for its warmth, festive message and characters.

Thank you Ninestar Press via NetGalley for a copy to read so I could give my honest and unbiased opinion.

What are you reading this Christmas? Do you love A Christmas Carol too? Let me know in the comments below or on social media.

Happy reading and stay safe!

Love

signature of Katie

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